Tag: clioF11

When I started my Masters program at the University of Edinburgh, I had an idea – an ideal – of what Grad School would be like. I envisioned intellectual conversations about history, art, theatre, literature, and science happening in the flat at dinner, over a cup of coffee, or a late night beer. I believed …

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This week Jeri and I are leading the discussion. She has already posted an excellent overview of the readings, so I thought I would look at the sites and tools. With Criminal Intent was a response to the Digging into Data challenge in 2009. It combines a specialized API with a personal research environment and …

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The readings which most resonated with me were the reports from the 2007 Working Group on Evaluating Public History Scholarship and the 2007 essay by William G. Thomas III, “Writing A Digital History Journal Article from Scratch: An Account”. They are relevant not only to the course, but to my future as a historian (academic/public/digital), …

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The title of this week in Clio Wired is Public History and the bulk of the reading list is web sites where the general public can engage with history. The sites are: Raid on Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704 Price of Freedom Gulag: Many Days, Many Lives Martha Washington: A Life Bracero History Archive …

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I enjoyed reading the various essays from A List Apart regarding design and usability, but the piece for the week which most engaged me was the article by Elings and Weibel regarding shared metadata standards for museums, archives, and libraries. My job at the historic house and what I am now doing with CHNM both …

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(For those not in the class, the syllabus is online.) The readings for this week took me from familiar ground to unfamiliar and back again. Some of them touched on some topics I’d been wanting to blog about but hadn’t quite gotten a hold of, including the history and nature of hypertext and the illusion …

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